Berries

Berries are generally crops for the patient gardener as a long term investment. Most berry plants usually don’t set an abundant crop for a few years, but some are faster, such as raspberries. With careful selection of cultivars, fruit can be produced over several months and used for fresh eating, jams and can be frozen for many months to be used later in desserts.

Photo from Unsplash by Cecilia Par
Berry Care & Varieties – Berry Plants not only provide delicious fruit through the warmer months, but also provide many design options. There are trees, shrubs, vines and groundcovers to select from.

Photo from Unsplash by Syd Wachs
Blueberries – These long lived deciduous or evergreen shrubs can be grown purely for their ornamental value. With their lovely pink brushed white bell shaped flowers and brilliant yellow, orange and red autumn foliage on a 1 to 2.4m high thornless shrub, they add value to any garden.

Photo from Unsplash by Hert Niks
Cranberries – These long lived deciduous or evergreen shrubs can be grown purely for their ornamental value. With their lovely pink brushed white bell shaped flowers and brilliant yellow, orange and red autumn foliage on a 1 to 2.4m high thornless shrub, they add value to any garden.

Photo from Unsplash by Anya Osintsova
Currants – Currants are small deciduous bushes with origins in cool European lands, where they thrived as forest edge plants, and later as domesticated varieties planted in gardens and hedgerows for their 5mm red, white or ‘black’ (dark purple) berries.

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden
Goji Berries – They are small but quite refreshing, not to mention a superfood. To grow a goji plant, plant it in a sunny position with adequate food, water and drainage.

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden
Jujube – The fresh fruit is often likened to apples (to which they are unrelated), with a crisp flesh and sweet flavour. Plants grow into small to medium sized trees up to 10 metres in height.

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Juniper Berries – The spicy, aromatic, dark purple berries of the juniper tree can be used fresh or dried, crushed or whole, to flavour casseroles, sauerkraut, marinades and stuffings and complement game meats as well as pork, lamb, beef and duck.

Photo from Unsplash by Mariann Guevara
Raspberries – If you can grow apples you can grow raspberries, and why wouldn’t you? The sweet juicy fruit is delectable when picked ripe and warm from the canes, truly placing the taste of the sun on your tongue.

Photo from Unsplash by Valeria Terekhina
Rosehips – Rosehips are very sweet and full of Vitamin C. Their seedy nature means they are best used in jams and jellies where the seeds are sieved out.

Photo from Unsplash by Maksim Shutov
Strawberries – Nothing compares to the taste of homegrown strawberries, and those monster things you buy in punnets at the shops are generally a poor (and expensive) imitation. So, why not grow some strawberries at home!