May 312017
 

A few years ago I wandered into the Wolf Bar in Carlton and was enveloped in the warm and heady nostalgic aroma of mulled wine. It shot me straight back to university days in the 70s and 80s, and  every June since has seen me reaching for cloves, cinnamon sticks and red wine. I just love this time of year: the satisfaction of a major clean and tidy up in the garden, planting for spring with all the hopes and promise ahead, the camellias in bloom and debating squeezing in just one more gorgeous tree only available in the bare root season. It may be getting chilly, but now I have my mulled wine. Read on!

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May 292017
 

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden

We sometimes speak to customers who are a little confused about what exactly an indigenous plant is. Yes, they are all Australian Natives, however the definition is a little more detailed. Specifically, indigenous plants are those that occur naturally in your local area. Obviously this term will refer to different plants according to where you live.
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May 282017
 

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden

Due to the removal of native trees across Australia for building, logging, agricultural or firewood purposes, millions of natural tree hollows are lost every year. The devastation is particularly apparent in urban environments, where the loss of established trees has seen a dramatic decline in native fauna over the last fifty years due to a lack of appropriate habitat and nesting sites. Even if you live in an area with quite large trees, hollows usually take over 100 years to develop. Thus it may be many years before appropriate nesting / roosting sites are available for many species. It is this lack of habitat that places significant stress on our native animal populations, and can result in once common garden residents becoming rare or non-existent in our suburbs.
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May 182017
 

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden

Sculpture and ceramics
by Nicola Hoyle & Ann Maree Gentile
19th May to 9th July 2017
Exhibition Opening – 2-4pm, Saturday 20th May

We are pleased to welcome Ann Maree and Nicola back to the Bolin Bolin Gallery. They have had a number of successful exhibitions in our gallery. Regulars to our gallery will know & love their work. Ann Maree makes colourful and quirky ceramic sculptures. Recently she has been making lots of birds. Some of her new work has been influenced by recent travels in France. Nicola’s metal sculptures and bird baths often feature in the gallery and garden at Bulleen Art & Garden, and are exemplified by the gallery sign in the new Bolin Bolin Gallery.

Find out more about this exhibition at http://gallery.baag.com.au/?p=3353

May 092017
 

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden

Persimmon are a highly ornamental deciduous fruit tree with dense bright green foliage, spectacular orange and red autumn colours, light grey bark, and a beautiful twisted form in old age. In same cases, the large orange fruit are held on the bare branches after leaf-fall, creating a jeweled sculpture! Height is 3-10 m, tending to under 5m in the home garden.

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May 022017
 

What garden is complete without a plethora of peas? A great winter crop, peas add vertical interest to the vegie patch, and give a decent yield for the amount of space they consume. And besides, there is no greater pleasure than a handful of home grown peas eaten straight from the pod. So go on, pop in some peas – you’ll be pleased you did!
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May 012017
 

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden

Autumn foliage at its most stunning. The cold days and nights bring out the deep reds, translucent oranges and butter yellows in our wonderful deciduous trees. Take the time to enjoy autumn’s late flowering salvias, wonderful quince fruit (with their heady scent) and savour the late season apples. Take a bolt to the Dandenongs and combine autumn colours with early flowering camellias. I just love this last hurrah before winter. So rug up and enjoy May in your garden!

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Apr 012017
 

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden

Our customer base is a pretty savvy and well informed one, and this is always re-enforced in March and April as sales of our native plants soar.  Our customers are well aware that this is the ideal time to plant natives and all of a sudden I am doubling orders for natives as they walk off the bench. The weather can still provide us with warm days in April, but without the hot sun and with rain happening or imminent it’s an ideal time for gardening and planting. Now is also the perfect time to start preparing your winter vegie patch. There’s plenty to do in the garden in April, so put summer behind you and get cracking!

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Mar 312017
 

Autumn is the best time to plant your winter vegetable garden. As the weather cools and the rain starts to fall more frequently it is a pleasure to get back into the garden, remove spent summer crops and plant vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli, broad beans and peas. It is an advantage to start planting at the beginning of autumn as many winter vegetables require a long growing period. Read on for everything you need to do to ensure a bumper winter vegie crop.

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Mar 222017
 

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden

Garlic has been around for thousands of years, dating as far back as the Egyptian pyramids. It has been widely used as both food and medicine in many cultures over the years. Garlic is really easy to grow if you plant it at the right time. If you would like a garlic flavour in your cooking all year round you can plant garlic chives as well. When buying garlic to plant, be sure to buy healthy, firm bulbs from a garden centre or garlic farm. You cannot grow bulbs bought from the supermarket as they are treated to prevent them from sprouting. (Supermarket chains generally don’t like the idea of their customers becoming self-sufficient.)

Another great reason to grow your own organic garlic at home is that ALL imported garlic, under Australian customs regulations, is sprayed with methyl bromide (a toxic biocide). Doesn’t sound too tasty does it?

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Mar 202017
 

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden

There are many beautiful plants that may be grown from bulbs, tubers, corms or roots. Many are suitable to grow in pots or small spaces and produce prolifically in the first season. They provide seasonal colour and many are excellent cut flowers.

There are three main seasons for plants grown from bulbs, corms, roots or tubers. The flowering seasons are spring, summer and autumn. Spring flowering bulbs are planted in late summer to autumn (the end of February until the end of April), summer flowering bulbs and perennials are planted in winter (the end of May until August or September), and Autumn flowering bulbs should be planted with the summer bulbs and perennials.
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Mar 012017
 

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden

It’s harvest time in your vegie garden, and time to think about what you want to plant in winter. It’s also a great time for making changes to your ornamental garden… the soil is still warm but the sun’s heat is not as intense. For those who have been asking, most of our autumn bulb range is now in stock (including garlic bulbs).
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Feb 262017
 

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden

Once again we will be at the Banyule Arty Farty Fest this year on Sunday 19 March from 11am – 4pm. Join Nicole, Harriet and Kat and learn all about growing from seed and the importance of water in your garden. There is also a free activity for the kids, who will be able to make and take home their own Grasshead.

The festival is on at Sills Bend, Warringal Parklands in Beverley Rd Heidelberg. More info at the Arty Farty Fest website.

Jan 302017
 

I am VERY glad I installed a drip system last summer, all automated, and finally all my pots are now included. It has made this summer a breeze, with zero deaths in the garden and hopefully a bearable water bill (I have yet to see it, so, potentially there could be one death resulting…).

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Jan 122017
 

Basil (Photograph by Bulleen Art & Garden)

Basil is one of the best known herbs in the world, and with good reason. It’s tasty, attractive and very easy to grow. With over 100 different species to choose from, Basil is never faulty!
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