Fragrant Plants

website builder There are many plants to choose from to add fragrance to your garden. Some have fragrant flowers, others aromatic foliage, or both. Fragrance adds an important dimension to the garden and should not be overlooked when selecting plants for your garden.

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden
Boronia – Quite a lot of breeding has been done with boronias and numerous lovely cultivars and hybrids are on the market and worth looking at. Perhaps the most exciting development is the grafting of boronias to give them a longer garden life.

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden
Fairy Magnolia – Fairy magnolias have a real presence in the garden, giving both gravitas and elegance.
Wonderfully free flowering over late winter and spring contrasting beautifully with the dark foliage.

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden
Insect Repellent Plants – Using insect repellent plants is about keeping a better balance in your garden. By using the natural properties of certain plants, we create a more natural ecosystem for the plants, soil, good bugs, and bacteria that make for a healthier environment for your plants to live in.

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden
Mock Orange – Philadelphus mexicanus – A perfumed, cottage garden must-have, Philadelphus mexicanus is an evergreen medium shrub with pointed oval shaped light-green leaves. They bear fragrant creamy-white single flowers in late spring.

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden
Perfumed Gardens – There are many plants to choose from to add fragrance to your garden. Some have fragrant flowers, others aromatic foliage, or both. Fragrance adds an important dimension to the garden and should not be overlooked when selecting plants for your garden.

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden
Rosemary – Rosemary is the perfect way to start off your herb garden. They are dead easy to grow providing you follow a few simple guidelines. Not only are they one of the most versatile herbs for cooking, they are also a beautiful ornamental plant that will bring colour and fragrance to your garden. The botanical name, Rosmarinus officinalis, means ‘dew of the sea’, very appropriate given how often rosemary is used in Mediterranean cooking.

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden
Roses – Since its earliest cultivation the rose has been hybridised from the species to now boast such styles as old garden roses, hybrid teas, floribundas (cluster flowered), miniatures, climbers (pillar, climbers and ramblers), weepers, David Austins (English roses), groundcover, patio and shrub roses.