Aug 222016
 

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden

Perfection is sitting outside with the warm sun on my face, the company of friends and family, and food on the table. To keep this image of perfection firmly in place, I need to exclude the uninvited guest – the mosquito.

I can slather on insecticide, have bottles ready for other people to use, or I can plan ahead, and create a mosquito free garden. They have lots of options, they don’t have to be in my garden, so I plan on making it as unattractive to them as I can, sort of a cultural desert for mozzies, no where to hang out, unattractive smells, nothing enticing.
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Aug 212016
 

Packaged Seeds

We have been working on our new packaged seed signage for quite a while, and we are very excited to finally have them installed. One of the hardest things about buying seeds is that often the packets feature no picture, and very little to no information about particular varieties… especially the rarer ones. We decided to fix that with our very own full colour sign system featuring specific information about why you should be choosing each variety. We hope you find them helpful next time you are searching for that elusive seed!

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Aug 052016
 

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden

An exhibition inspired by trips to Japan led by Linda de Toma and Naoko Coghlan focussing on ceramics and textiles.
5 August-4 September

This is an exhibition to demonstrate the influence a visit to Japan has had on the artwork of two groups of travellers. Linda De Toma, founder of Claydreamers studio, is a ceramic artist with a passion for Japan and Japanese ceramics. Naoko Coghlan is a potter who grew up in Japan but now has her home in Melbourne. They got together in 2014 to plan a tour designed to introduce small groups to Japanese sights and culture, as well as pottery and other arts and crafts.

Click here for more information and pictures.

Aug 012016
 

Well, the last weeks of winter are finally here, with the scent of Wattle signalling the promise of spring just around the corner. The first Magnolias are in flower and the gold and purple of Acacias and Hardenbergias create a dramatic floral display. The cold, frosty mornings are a prelude to the burst of new growth that heralds the coming new season of life. We have already had our fair share of frosty mornings and more are likely, so continue on with those frost damage prevention measures for a few more weeks yet.
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Jul 282016
 

Photo from Wiki Commons

If you have a Lisbon Lemon, you are probably looking at a glut of lemons right now. Even Eureka and Meyer lemon trees are full of fruit, but it is the Lisbons that are just groaning with huge loads of lemons. And these are the best of lemons, super lemony, tart, strong, wonderful skin for grating – the perfect lemon.

So, what to do with this superfluity of lemons? For years my brother has been banging on about his preserved lemons, I have been nodding gently and looking impressed, but secretly wondering what on earth you actually DO with preserved lemons. Then… my niece cooked me dinner one night and it was sensational. I was tactfully asking exactly what was in the dish to take it from good to superb, when she told me how the preserved lemons she had made took it to the next level – and this was in New York, in a kitchen the size of a postage stamp. I asked around, and it seems everyone is using preserved lemons, especially in Morrocan cooking (yet another culinary train that left without me).
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Jul 202016
 

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden

In the depths of winter Garrya elliptica suddenly changes from a useful, but somewhat boring, grey-green evergreen shrub into a supremely elegant showstopper. Clever gardeners plant it where the long cascading tassels (catkins) are shown to advantage, sometimes against a wall, sometimes as a shrub along the front fence, always eye-catching. It flowers from mid-winter into spring, with the tassels gradually elongating and subtly changing. In some ways this is a showy plant, but the silvery grey coloured tassels, highlighted against the grey green glossy and slightly wavy foliage, give it an elegant subtlety which lends itself to many different styles of gardens. The leaves are glossy on top but soft and woolly underneath, a lovely contrast and another subtle touch.
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Jul 012016
 

Photo from Wiki Commons © by Jean Jacques Milan

My main use for this shrub is using it where nothing else will survive, or when everything I try just limps along, not quite dying, but certainly not thriving. I plant an Elaeagnus and it just bolts away forming a strong healthy plant and making that frustrating ‘failure to thrive’ area just disappear. Particularly useful in planting under established trees, where everything tried just struggles.
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Jun 292016
 

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden

Every September we get customers bringing in thickened bubbly curled and distorted leaves from their peaches and nectarines, by then it is too late to treat and all we can do is offer a rueful smile and tell people what to do for next year. This is Peach Leaf Curl, a very unsightly and damaging problem caused by the fungus Taphrina deformans. If left untreated, it can cause dieback of new shoots, early fruit drop, reduction of vigour, and eventually death of the tree. The cool wet spring conditions in Victoria are ideal for this particular fungus, so you need to be proactive in controlling this disease.
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Jun 272016
 

Photo from Wiki Commons

Rhubarb adapts well to all climatic zones and most soils with good drainage. It can be grown in full sun or part shade, but avoid planting in heavy shade. Rhubarb plants are gross feeders and beds should be prepared by working through liberal quantities of well-rotted manure. Plant crowns 1-1.5m apart with the top of the crown level with the soil surface. Harvest very sparingly in the first year.
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Jun 052016
 

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden

AA Bridge Timbers

We have just received this load of magnificent Bridge Timbers from Queensland. They are mostly Redgum, with the odd Ironbark thrown in for good measure. Amazing condition, very rare. Come down and check them out!

$145 each (or $130 each in a pack of 12 or more)
Limited stock

Size: Colossal size of 2.7 m x 250 mm x 175 mm!
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Jun 012016
 

Photo © Bulleen Art & Garden

An exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture by Melissa Thomas
3 June-10 July 2016

Oil Paintings that express the textures and colours of the Beautiful succulents that give us so much joy. Sculptures that enhance our conceptual ideas of these interesting plants. Melissa Thomas is a well known artist who has previously exhibited at Bulleen Art & Garden a number of times.

Click here for more information and pictures.

May 312016
 

Great memories of running through piles of leaves, all rugged up, having a ball. Probably not shared by my father holding the rake – but I love this time of year. The satisfaction of a major tidy up, planting for spring with all the hopes and promise ahead, the camellias starting to bloom and wondering if I can squeeze in just one more gorgeous tree only available in the bare root season. It may be getting chilly, but there are still loads of winter gardening jobs to keep you warm. Read on!

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May 252016
 

BAAG will once again be hosting an Australia’s Biggest Morning Tea to raise money for the Cancer Council. Australia’s Biggest Morning Tea is an opportunity for friends, family or workmates to come together, share a cuppa and some delicious food, whilst helping those affected by cancer. We would love you to join us in our classroom on Thursday June 9th from 10:30am until 11:30pm. You are welcome to bring a plate of food to donate, or you can just come along with an appetite and your donation! If you plan to bring a plate, please list the ingredients on a sheet of paper for those with allergies.